Saturday, March 10, 2018

From The Archives: Risen Theories on The Continuance of Life

[First Posted April 9, 2014]

August was recently doubly blessed by the chance of a rare and lengthy interview by Angela Artemis, well-known and highly respected intuitive medium and writer, and then Tim & August are featured in another interview - an entire chapter - in Scott Podmore's amazing and ground-breaking book, "Conversations With Mediums." You can read August's review of Scott's book at Amazon.

The interview with Angela was indeed so lengthy that it wasn't feasible to include it all, and she did a brilliant editing job, which couldn't have been easy. Tim would like to additionally provide the  particular but very complex and controversial question and answer about "reincarnation" which had to be pared down quite a bit  for space. We both find it fascinating and want to share it in its entirety. Here it is:

1.       You don’t support the theory that we reincarnate. Why? What is your theory of how we progress and grow as souls if we do not incarnate again?

I don’t support it because I don’t need or want to. Tim knew I had no interest in even including it in the book, but The Risen Assembly did, and so he took on the assignment of researching and manifesting the final chapter, “The Pastime of Reincarnation” which turned out to be the culmination of all the previous chapters. I’ve made the entire chapter freely available online as a pdf document for any and all to read or download and save, and which can be accessed here.

Tim shared that his ideas about pre-lives, past lives, between-lives, and so on were part of a widespread belief system he had brought into his new Risen existence. After relentlessly bothering people there about where he could get information and training about returning to the earth, he was sent to “a special school for pests, where even know-it-alls can be educated.” In turn, he shared with me, to the best of his self-professed limited understanding, some of the things brought to his attention about what he calls “the pastime of reincarnation.”

Why pastime? “Because,” Tim said, “It’s all just a game, a pastime—literally, a past time.”  He acknowledges that many will consider this an outrageous and even heretical suggestion, and so encourages each one of us to investigate on our own, and not take what he or anyone else says as true. “Truth,” Tim said, “Looks different from diverse perspectives.”

In an attempt to encapsulate some of the more complex ideas, Tim offers three brief suggestions as summaries to keep in mind:
   1.      One’s reality is defined by three I’s: Individuality, Intensity, and Infinity.
   2.      Only one individual can claim that individual’s life experience.
   3.      When Original Creator Source gifts us with individuality, It always gets it entirely right the first time.

He goes into great depth regarding various “Risen theories” about the continuance of life and living, and it seems clear that many on the Other Side have similar as well as conflicting ideas about the topic of rebirth. It seems to be a robust topic of research and debate there, stimulating more questions rather than resolving them.

Here are a few examples:

Theories of Race Evolution
“Classical” reincarnation – meaning, returning to the same Earth but in a different role --  may have actually once existed countless earthly eons ago, but was phased out or evolved to something entirely different, and so is no longer an active process of transition. Tim cites examples of certain older, indigenous cultures that may have vanished because of their transformative evolution.

Theories of Individual Evolution
Allegedly, some individuals return to earth in the “classical” model because they haven’t yet evolved to a higher vibrating state of conscious awareness, enabling them to change their belief system and thus break free of the cycles of birth-death-rebirth, to then “de-planet” off and beyond the earth into other dimensions.  Such individuals differ from those who try to focus those same abilities to maintain beliefs of reincarnation, and where the goals are different.

Theories Discounting Pre-existence
Tim elaborates on this line of thought which branches from the theories of individual evolution:
“There appears to be some indication that the vast majority of Risen—perhaps all—did not exist as individuals prior to their human existence on the earth. Those who were born on the earth first came into existence there as individuals. We have to start somewhere, and that is what the earth is for. Humanity appears to have been custom-made to extend life through a particular process known as ‘reproduction’ which is tailored—or ‘designed,’ as some Risen theorists assert—specifically for life on a planet such as the earth. It has been observed on worlds in other dimensions that the life-extension process does not always follow this plan.

“The purpose of Earth, then, would be as the starting place for our birth as an individual. It provides us with an initial environment in which to begin to get a sense of the individuality that is ours forever, and nothing more than that. Even if we could be reborn back onto the planet, we would never be able to learn all there is to know, no matter how many times we return—which some seem to believe is the absolute requirement for eventual de-planeting. As our time on the earth is, by default, limited in an earthly fashion, so then are the experiences within that time.

Theories of Mega-Individuality
This theory involves the notion of a group soul, where many individuals are sparked from a “mega-being.” Perhaps they will eventually all reunite into yet another mega-being. Tim explains: “These sparks would be seeded possibly on just one world, such as earth, or on several—perhaps even other dimensions would be utilized. Not all would necessarily be seeded at the same time in the same era, but scattered across many time periods to gain a multi-experience as extensive and abundant as possible for the sake of the group mind. They would all have varying awareness of one another as well as individual feelings of pre-existence. This might explain the feelings of having lived other lives in other times. Individuals would be interconnected through their own evolving group underconscious. Their rate of return to Mega-Being Mind would be greatly different amongst them, spanning perhaps what an earth-mind might experience as trillions of millennia, or longer. There would be an intuitive connection between those who have transitioned into the astral dimensions. The configurations would be creatively endless in order to achieve the maximal amount of experience, information gathering, and communication. Those who have strong intuitive connections with the sparked individuals in other dimensions might struggle with confusion about where their real natal home is.”

Tim summarizes:
“So it appears to me thus far that we are reborn upon our transition, but this rebirth is always into a new world and a unique state of existence, not back into the old one. The old one no longer exists—life is experienced in the continual now. We develop and carry forward the template for our new life. We are the template, and a new world will simultaneously arise from us as we arise from it, as a direct result of how we lived our lives on earth or from wherever we are continuously transitioning, as we transmute ever onward.

He goes on to clarify:
“It’s sometimes inferred that our spirits will take on new bodies again. Actually, our spirit will be our actual body, and then at some point it becomes the cocoon for the next transition. A higher vibrating form of spiritual being will then evolve from that event, eventually moving on to yet another new geography. The spirit then becomes a newer form of body that is appropriate to the higher vibration. It cannot return to earth to be reborn once again because its new and higher state of vibration would no longer be appropriate there. Upon transition one is no longer spiritually human because of the higher vibration, and so cannot return to being earthly human in the equivalent way.

All the above barely does justice to the rich and extensive material Tim was able to bring forth, going into great and detailed depth regarding the more elusive psychospiritual issues. “The underlying factor consistently supporting the generally unchallenged belief in reincarnation is that old nemesis, the fear of mortality—and even fear of immortality. The thought that one is immortal and will have to move beyond the earth, never to return, can be extremely threatening, especially if one has not taken the time to become informed of the facts about the process.”

Virtual Reincarnation
He expounds on a novel but brilliant hypothesis, which is that while we cannot literally reincarnate, we can virtually reincarnate:

“If one wants to reincarnate, it’s not possible in the ultimate way of creating another original life for oneself. However, if you want to have the experience of a pre-existence to the primal birth on the home planet, or the experience of reincarnation, you can have it, including that of being a co-creative manifestor. As we make our own self-experiences we also make our own ‘rules’ or ‘laws’ about our experiences.”

I commented that it all sounded like some fantastic, enormous game.

“So why can’t it be? If you want to step into the part and play it to the hilt, who says you can’t? If you want to make up a game about reincarnation and make it seem so real that it appears real, why not? No reason whatsoever. And isn’t it interesting that the word ‘game’ is synonymous with pastime? ”

I dared to ask, “How is this done?”

“It appears that any manifestation of reincarnation is not enacted upon the original version of earth. But there’s no reason why a person can’t manifest yet another experience on another version of earth that is completely like the one they left. Mind is that powerful. Everyone can manifest their very own earth to return to, exactly like the one they left. Of course there would have to be a built-in restriction of self-imposed amnesia to make it suit one’s beliefs and needs, and this amnesia can be tailored in any way. And if they want, souls can co-creatively manifest the experience of being together or finding one another as their own desires for drama dictate. Sometimes there are ‘leaks’ that get past the amnesia—hence, feelings of déjà vu, past lives, and all kinds of ‘evidence’ that would manifest to help sustain the illusion. Since the illusion is built directly upon a foundation of Reality it has an apparent feeling of reality all its own and will respond to its manifestor’s mind as directed.”


Finally, I can very briefly comment about progress and growth as related to the idea of reincarnation: They cannot be achieved backwards.

From The Archives: Cristes Mæsse

[First posted 12/24/10 - a reader recently wrote about finding it "evocative" . . . the summer, as least in this part of the world, is past its zenith, and before we know it, we will be crossing the threshold of a new year. Perhaps this previous post can continue to offer some reflection of who and where we are, in this moment.]


When the tips of the pines
Touch the twinkling stars
On the cold, crisp nights of December,
May your blessings be more
Than you've ever hoped for,
And your Christmas a warmth to remember.

~ a poem on a card sent by Aunt Doris ~

For some reason, as I began cooking this morning of Christmas Day Eve, I was impressed to put on a CD of Mozart's Requiem Mass in D Minor – a strange kind of music for Noël . . . nonetheless, it affects me deeply, evoking complex emotions, all tinged with sadness.

The turnips are peeled and roasting – my contribution towards tomorrow's cozy gathering of friends, coming together to celebrate many things – consciously aware living, loving, and sobriety. Together, we manifest and share a "field of gratitude" that spontaneously arises from our gathering together.

In The Risen, we explore the idea of "fields" – realities that interpenetrate our material one, and which we often can sense emotionally, psychologically, spiritually and even physically. This idea is practically no longer abstract, but is quickly becoming a realized fact by primarily quantum scientists, many inspired by theoretical biologist Rupert Sheldrake's understanding that there is no "inside" or "outside" to one's mind. It is further noted in The Risen:
"Sheldrake suggests that memory is not stored in the brain, which is a kind of tuning system, rather than a device for storing memories. Our brain resonates within a morphic or morphogenic field. This resonance is a form-shaping field, an invisible organization structure wherein all experiential information is recorded and stored.
"Morphogenic fields are patterns that structure our reality. Older, primal societies have been well aware that the forms of our experiences are shaped by something greater than us, and of which we are simultaneously a part. Modern, 'civilized' societies have contracted the mind into the idea that the mind exists only within the confines of our physical skulls."
Sheldrake would likely agree with the idea of the spirit of a holiday—that it’s a morphic field containing the memories and rituals associated with that holiday.
Viewed from this perspective, the spirit within a human being resonates from within the larger spiritual morphogenic field. From their perspective, the Risen suggest that the so-called boundaries of any field are arbitrary and subject to one’s perceptual awareness, meaning that the fields are infinite in space and time. Thus, Risen fields interpenetrate non-Risen fields, which also interpenetrate." (pp. 137-138)
In 21st century terms, this is "non-locality". Non-locality is one of several important principles of quantum physics, and has given rise to the concept of nonlocal space, explained by Pim van Lommel, MD as “ … a multidimensional space, with nothing but possibilities … and without certainties, without matter, and without a role for time and distance … (and) represents a hidden reality that, at the quantum level, exerts a continuous influence on our physical world, which is the complement of nonlocal space."  While interpenetrating the local consciousness of the physical brain, non-local consciousness expands unbounded beyond it, and is believed by many to support perceptual reality. This concept underlies theories about after-life survival, remote viewing, and other out-of-body experiences. (From his book, Consciousness Beyond Life: The Science of the Near-Death Experience, pp. 227-28) [Highly recommended.]

 Mozart claimed that he heard the music in his head and that all he had to do was transcribe it; he did this in near-perfect notation in a very brief window of time. Van Lommel suggests that such creativity, inspiration, and sudden scientific insight might be explained by unconscious, or even conscious contact with non-local consciousness. His book explores in great detail how near-death experiences bring the person into contact with other fields of consciousness – other worlds – in this way.

It's clear to me that I'm experiencing "fields within fields" – or worlds within worlds, as the Risen say. Obviously I'm not in the land of sleigh bells and candy canes, but somewhere in the Deep. I wonder what is is that  I'm accessing in the field of Mozart's Requiem. As I ponder more I begin to realize that there is sadness is the memory of the story of a little baby who will grow up, and as a young man,  "die" a seemingly tragic, lonely death, abandoned by the world he loved so much; I think of his mother as well. Mozart was dying as he struggled to finish this piece, and transitioned before it could be completed. He captured these complex ego-mind feelings of  the direct experience of his own transition, along with the "tragedy and loss" that are believed to be inseparable by death. Surrounding Requiem is much controversy and confusion, unanswered questions and myth. While the story of the man who was also a Christ clearly embodies the almost inconceivable news that there is no death, only more life, much myth and confusion surround the drama as well.

Many fields of spirituality and religion converge around this time of the year, a few according to the light reaching the earth from the sun, and others because someone once did or said something that continues to resonate with millions of still earth-bound souls. One funny question that I get asked often is about my "religion": "Are you Christian? Jewish? Buddhist? Pagan? Democrat? Vegetarian?"  My answer has always been the same: "I don't remember." There is the potential for magic and miracles of wonder in them all. Krishnamurti once said,  "Religion is the frozen thought of man out of which they build temples." He also said, "I maintain that Truth is a pathless land, and you cannot approach it by any path whatsoever, by any religion, by any sect."

The Requiem's saddening minor chords of the last movement of the sequence, the Lacrimosa, breaks off after only eight bars, unfinished. One can only wonder if Mozart was simultaneously having near-death experiences as he struggled to complete his mission. He transitioned on December 5, 1791. Perhaps I'm accessing something of his world, his field, his non-locality while listening to his final offering to our terrestrial world. The lovely little Christmas card from my Aunt Doris also brings me in contact with some kind of field. Now in her upper-eighties, she is one of the few remaining, older relatives still on the earth (once there were so very many!) There is, at first, sadness with this thought, but if I stay with the sadness, while letting the ego-mental thinking fade away, I'm brought to an awakened awareness of Authentic Self, and then through some sort of door, an entryway into a deeper aspect of another reality, and more light begins to shine through what I first perceived as shadow. This is the door to the Risen lands, and not only light, but laughter and joy beam forth from it, and suddenly I begin to understand the meaning of Cristes mæsse, which means literally, "the anointed one's mission." We all have this mission, as anointed with spirit by Creator Source, to find the door to Home, for "blessings more than we ever hoped for."

Tim made his transition on a Christmas Eve, falling deeply asleep here and slowly awakening there. Although my mental grief about it has been worked through over the years, and it seems nothing more than the dream it was, my body still remembers in its own way, and accesses biological fields that are inherently part of a terrestrial existence. So a little sadness is there too, wistfulness, really, which also becomes a door to where Tim actually is now, the present, which is all we every really have.